Adjusting to 6 Figures

Writing Reports with More Clarity

Clarity is key when writing your reports as an independent insurance adjuster. If your reports are sloppy, unclear, or contain numerous grammatical errors, you may wind up getting in trouble with your hiring company, or even with the law if your reports contain many inaccuracies. Even if you’re great at your job, you may have trouble writing.

Clarity is key when writing your reports as an independent insurance adjuster. If your reports are sloppy, unclear, or contain numerous grammatical errors, you may wind up getting in trouble with your hiring company, or even with the law if your reports contain many inaccuracies. Even if you’re great at your job, you may have trouble writing, and that’s okay! Here’s a quick look at some tips to help you write reports with more clarity:

1. Create an Outline

Creating an outline before you write your report provides a great framework for the actual writing. You’ll have every date, figure, and description written out in front of you, and you’ll just have to take that information and put it into your report. This increases clarity in your writing because you’ll ensure that you aren’t missing anything. You can also use your notes to double check numbers and figures to avoid trouble with inaccuracies or inconsistencies.

Using an outline also allows you to make sure you include all pertinent names, dates, locations, and other information. If you’re trying to write your reports from memory or from some hastily-scribbled notes on a napkin, you may miss some extremely important information. Write a simple outline that includes all necessary information, and work from your outline to draft your report.

2. Use Clear Language

If you aren’t absolutely clear on the definition of a word, don’t use it. It can be tempting to use “fancy” words to make your reports sound more sophisticated or authoritative, but when words are used incorrectly, or in ways that can be misconstrued, trouble may arise. Use language that is clear and concise, that gets straight to the point and leaves no room for misunderstanding.

3. Proofread

After writing a report, take a short break, then come back and read it again. Make sure there are no grammatical or punctuation errors, confusing or misleading words or phrases, or incorrect or inconsistent numbers or figures. Taking a break between writing and proofreading allows you to approach the report with “fresh eyes.” You’ll be more able to spot issues in your writing and you’ll be ready to read the report for clarity and consistency. Proofreading provides an extra buffer between the writing process and the final submitting of the report, giving you a chance to catch and adjust the report where necessary and avoid trouble later on.

 

Looking for more intense training?  Check out our Adjuster Report Writing Certification course today!

Jeremy Rettig

After discovering independent adjusting, Jeremy Rettig committed himself to becoming a student to the claims industry and a mentor to many. Now, Jeremy Rettig is a full-time claims mentor and trainer, and the founder of multiple insurance technology solutions.

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