Adjusting to 6 Figures

Beyond Just Working in the Field: Writing Tips for IAs

Many independent adjusters are great at the fieldwork portion of their duties, but struggle when it comes to writing reports. Reports should be turned in promptly and easily processed by those in charge of the insurance policy. It is important to keep a report clear, double-check for errors, and never assume that the person reading the report already knows the field claim situation.

Many independent adjusters are great at the fieldwork portion of their duties, but struggle when it comes to writing reports. Reports should be turned in promptly and easily processed by those in charge of the insurance policy. It is important to keep a report clear, double-check for errors, and never assume that the person reading the report already knows the field claim situation.

Keep it Clear

The best way to write clearly is to use short sentences and remember to utilize proper punctuation and capitalization. There’s a fine line between cluttering a report with too many names and events or leaving out pertinent information. This makes being clear especially important. Whoever reads the report needs to know the details of the damage, but does not need a lot of opinion statements. The easiest way to write clearly is to be truthful and stick to the facts.

Double-Check Paragraphs for Errors

So often independent adjusters are too focused on their fieldwork and do not pay enough attention to their paperwork. Companies that hire independent adjusters have an expectation of professionalism that extends to the writing of reports. Misspelled words and non-existent punctuation in a write-up can even lead to the discontinuation of a working relationship. A report that is full of errors may have to be re-written by in-house staff. A confusing report also requires follow-up phone calls and emails to the independent adjuster for clarification. Double-checking your writing prior to closing a claim will be better for all involved when it comes to time management and efficiency.

Do Not Assume

IAs often write a claim file report with the assumption that anyone reading it will understand the entire situation. This is often not the case and can lead to underwriters and agents becoming disgruntled with an independent adjuster’s work product. Always write a report in the third-person and include relevant names, dates, and payouts. Be sure to set the scene and give the exact reason why a claim was filed. Describe how the damage occurred at the site. This will help in-house staff whenever they need to look back and review a file. It will also negate the need to constantly update and clarify information for new individuals who come in contact with the claim.

 

Looking for more intense training?  Check out our Adjuster Report Writing Certification course today!

 

 

Jeremy Rettig

After discovering independent adjusting, Jeremy Rettig committed himself to becoming a student to the claims industry and a mentor to many. Now, Jeremy Rettig is a full-time claims mentor and trainer, and the founder of multiple insurance technology solutions.

1 comment

  • Very good article. So many times In an event we just get caught up in the filling in the blanks on a report template. I don’t believe it’s as bad with daily claims.

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